Cyber Civics: Teach Year 3

In our multimedia world, digital citizens need skills to critically evaluate and creatively produce media—not just the printed word, but visual/audio media too! This program provides a turnkey curriculum plus support for a full year of "Media Literacy For Positive Participation" in-class lessons.

About this course

This course provides educators, parents, and/or community leaders all the materials needed to confidently teach a full year of weekly "Media Literacy For Positive Participation" in-classroom lessons. This is "the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and create media in a variety of forms." Within this turn-key program you will find lessons (downloadable and easy-to-teach), videos, background materials, and access to one-to-one support. 

This is Year 3 of the Cyber Civics program (find Year 1 here and Year 2 here), a three-year middle school digital citizenship and literacy curriculum that addresses an urgent and growing need to prepare students with skills to become ethical, knowledgeable, and empowered “digital citizens.” 

Since the first Cyber Civics class was taught in 2010, this program has yielded outcomes that have exceeded our greatest expectations, it has attracted national media attention, been honored as an "Innovation in Education" finalist by Project Tomorrow and the O.C. Tech Alliance, and is now being taught in schools in 19 states. We are thrilled to make it available so that all students may benefit from these important lessons in digital life skills.

Visit our website to learn more: www.cybercivics.com. Or call us at (949) 481-4319

Why "Media Literacy"?

"No longer is it enough to be able to read the printed word; children, youth, and adults too, need the ability to both critically interpret the powerful images of a multimedia culture and express themselves in multiple media forms."

-Elizabeth Thoman and Tessa Jolls, Media Literacy: A National Priority for a Changing World

In 2015, the Pew Research Center reported that "teens go online 'almost constantly'" facilitated by the widespread access to new technologies. For more hours per day than they spend in school or with their families, they are exposed to the powerful images and sounds of a multimedia world. In order to become literate participants, young people must be just as fluent in the language of images and sounds as they are at reading the printed word. Additionally, they need opportunities to practice using critical thinking skills to evaluate the daily assault of media messages and to learn how to become positive participants in the dialogue of their day. This is so important that many states across the U.S. have recently mandated that "media literacy" lessons be taught in school.

So, after teaching Cyber Civics: Year 1 (Digital Citizenship) and Year 2 (Information Literacy), it was clear students were prepared and eager to put their critical thinking skills to work both analyzing and creating media messages. So this powerful third year of Cyber Civics was created. While there are many excellent lessons in media literacy available elsewhere, Cyber Civics curates some of the best and combines them with all new lessons that build upon the strong foundation of the previous two years of this program. Like Years 1 and 2, this year emphasizes ethical and critical thinking, discussion and decision-making through hands-on projects, problem-solving activities, and role-play. Although Year 3 can be taught without technology, it works best when students have access to computers or tablets in the classroom.

                                                                          Download a sample lesson here.
                                       

Frequently Asked Questions

  • The program fee ($699) provides a school-wide license for one full year.
  • Renewal is only $149/yr. per school. By renewing teachers get updated materials, uninterrupted access/support.
  • Any teacher at the school can open his or her own account and get full support.
  • Includes curriculum, videos, resources, support, professional development and monthly news regarding updates.
  • We accept secure credit card payments (Pay Pal, Stripe) via this site.
  • We accept Purchase Orders. For a quote or to pay via P.O., contact us
  • For multiple school/district discounts, contact us
  • Contact us for demonstrations or presentations.
  • Please download the Cyber Civics™ Year 3 FAQ's.

Contact us at support@cybercivics.com or call (949) 481-4319

Plus!

About the Founder

Diana Graber, M.A., created and teaches Cyber Civics™ at Journey School, a public charter Waldorf school in Southern California. She has an extensive background as a media producer and also co-founded CyberWise, a digital literacy resource for parents; and CyberWise Certified, a self-paced, online certification program to help educators prepare to teach these lessons. As an Adjunct Professor of Media Psychology at the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology she taught "Media Psychology for the 21st Century." Her published paper: New Media Literacy Education: A Developmental Approach (JMLE, 2012) provides the foundational research for the Cyber Civics™ program. She is also a regular contributor to the Huffington Post

Testimonials

“Since the Cyber Civics™ classes started at our school, there have been only three reported incidences of poor digital behavior; none in the last two years. This is unheard of in this day and age. What has been a small investment has paid off tenfold. Plus it allows us to put our energy on what matters most, learning and teaching in a happy, safe, and healthy community.”

-Shaheer Faltas, Journey School Administrator

 

  “Over the course of three years working with Diana Graber and watching her develop the curriculum, I recognize that it is based on the the same cognitive developmental skills that are foundational to Waldorf teaching in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades. While this curriculum has found a rich home in Waldorf schools that foster ethical development, it is a curriculum that can fit in all educational settings.

- Bonnie River, Chair of Hybrid Program, Rudolf Steiner College

 

 "Cyber Civics is the best digital media literacy curriculum I've seen yet as it is developmentally based and creative."

-Sheila Reilly, Administrator, Woodland Star Charter School

 

 "Since cyber-life is imperative to a child's future, isn't it about time to demand that schools implement Cyber Civics classes?"

-Online Expert Sue Scheff, in "Digital Citizenship Is as Important as Potty Training: Let's Start Cyber Civics In All Schools

 

 "We know that digital-citizenship education works. The Journey School in Aliso Viejo, a small Southern California city, is an example of a digital-citizenship success story. Since instituting a three-year middle school series on digital citizenship, information literacy, and media-literacy courses to teach critical-thinking skills around media texts of all kinds—music videos, film, and print advertising—the school has nearly eliminated bullying and behavioral issues ans significanly boosted standardized-test scores."

                                                                  -Erin McNeill, "Even 'Digital Natives' Need Digital Training" in Education Week                                                                                       

"Journey School in Aliso Viejo implemented a weekly course to help kids navigate the online world...a lot of young kids don't appreciate that what they post online is permanent, and need to be taught that their digital footprint will live forever. To get this message through to kids, nothing beats peer-to-peer interactions."

-Al Jazeera's "America Tonight"  

"We are not only citizens of the town, state and country we live in, but also digital citizens of the online world.  As such, how we interact with the community at large is an increasingly-important part of our lives.  And just like a Civics class you may have taken in high school, every student in the near future will be taking a Cyber Civics class."

-David Ryan Polgar, WWLP-22 News

Curriculum

  • Media Literacy For Positive Participation
  • Preview
    What IS Media Literacy?
  • Welcome to Year 3
  • Syllabus
  • Preparing To Teach Year 3
  • NAMLE: Core Principles of Media Literacy Education
  • Media Literacy Education Legislation
  • Unit 1: Living in a Participatory Culture
  • Lesson 1: Are You a Consumer or a Producer?
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Paying Attention to Your Attention
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Let's Get Blogging (2 Parts)
  • Lesson 3: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Video 2
  • Unit 2: Calling On Critical Thinking
  • Lesson 1: C.R.A.P. Detection, Part 1
  • Lesson 2: C.R.A.P. Detection, Part 2
  • Unit 3: Fake News
  • Lesson 1: What's "News"?
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Urban Legend or Not?
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Is It Fake or Not?
  • Unit 4: Seeing Stereotypes
  • Lesson 1: Stereotypes in Media, Part 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 2
  • Lesson 2: Stereotypes in Media, Part 2
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Video 2
  • Lesson 3: Selling to the Stereotypes (2 Parts)
  • Unit 5: Visual Literacy
  • Lesson 1: Every Picture Tells a Story
  • Lesson 2: Before There Was Photoshop
  • Lesson 3: Spot That Photoshop
  • Lesson 3: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Video 2
  • Lesson 3: Video 3
  • Lesson 4: Food Takes Center Stage
  • Lesson 4: Video 1
  • Lesson 4: Video 2
  • Lesson 4: Video 3
  • Unit 6: Sexting
  • Lesson 1: Can We Talk About Sexting? Part 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Can We Talk About Sexting? Part 2
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Video 2
  • Unit 7: Final Project Prep
  • Lesson 1: Constructing an Effective Search Query
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Using Filters & Operators (2 parts)
  • Lesson 3: Search Like a Pro
  • Lesson 3: Video 1
  • Lesson 4: Avoiding Plagiarism
  • Lesson 4: Video 1
  • Lesson 4: Video 2
  • Lesson 4: Video 3
  • Lesson 4: Video 4
  • Lesson 5: How To Cite Right
  • Lesson 5: Video 1
  • Lesson 6: Let's Review! Copyright, Fair Use, Public Domain
  • Lesson 6: Video 1
  • Lesson 7: Present Like a Pro!
  • Lesson 7: Video 1
  • Lesson 7: Video 2
  • Lesson 7: Video 3
  • Lesson 7: Video 4
  • Lesson 7: Video 5
  • Unit 8: Positive Participation
  • Lesson 1: The Power of Social Media
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 2
  • Lesson 2: GoEnnounce Yourself
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Trolls, Lurkers, and Upstanders
  • Final Project
  • Are You a Consumer or a Producer Now?

About this course

This course provides educators, parents, and/or community leaders all the materials needed to confidently teach a full year of weekly "Media Literacy For Positive Participation" in-classroom lessons. This is "the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and create media in a variety of forms." Within this turn-key program you will find lessons (downloadable and easy-to-teach), videos, background materials, and access to one-to-one support. 

This is Year 3 of the Cyber Civics program (find Year 1 here and Year 2 here), a three-year middle school digital citizenship and literacy curriculum that addresses an urgent and growing need to prepare students with skills to become ethical, knowledgeable, and empowered “digital citizens.” 

Since the first Cyber Civics class was taught in 2010, this program has yielded outcomes that have exceeded our greatest expectations, it has attracted national media attention, been honored as an "Innovation in Education" finalist by Project Tomorrow and the O.C. Tech Alliance, and is now being taught in schools in 19 states. We are thrilled to make it available so that all students may benefit from these important lessons in digital life skills.

Visit our website to learn more: www.cybercivics.com. Or call us at (949) 481-4319

Why "Media Literacy"?

"No longer is it enough to be able to read the printed word; children, youth, and adults too, need the ability to both critically interpret the powerful images of a multimedia culture and express themselves in multiple media forms."

-Elizabeth Thoman and Tessa Jolls, Media Literacy: A National Priority for a Changing World

In 2015, the Pew Research Center reported that "teens go online 'almost constantly'" facilitated by the widespread access to new technologies. For more hours per day than they spend in school or with their families, they are exposed to the powerful images and sounds of a multimedia world. In order to become literate participants, young people must be just as fluent in the language of images and sounds as they are at reading the printed word. Additionally, they need opportunities to practice using critical thinking skills to evaluate the daily assault of media messages and to learn how to become positive participants in the dialogue of their day. This is so important that many states across the U.S. have recently mandated that "media literacy" lessons be taught in school.

So, after teaching Cyber Civics: Year 1 (Digital Citizenship) and Year 2 (Information Literacy), it was clear students were prepared and eager to put their critical thinking skills to work both analyzing and creating media messages. So this powerful third year of Cyber Civics was created. While there are many excellent lessons in media literacy available elsewhere, Cyber Civics curates some of the best and combines them with all new lessons that build upon the strong foundation of the previous two years of this program. Like Years 1 and 2, this year emphasizes ethical and critical thinking, discussion and decision-making through hands-on projects, problem-solving activities, and role-play. Although Year 3 can be taught without technology, it works best when students have access to computers or tablets in the classroom.

                                                                          Download a sample lesson here.
                                       

Frequently Asked Questions

  • The program fee ($699) provides a school-wide license for one full year.
  • Renewal is only $149/yr. per school. By renewing teachers get updated materials, uninterrupted access/support.
  • Any teacher at the school can open his or her own account and get full support.
  • Includes curriculum, videos, resources, support, professional development and monthly news regarding updates.
  • We accept secure credit card payments (Pay Pal, Stripe) via this site.
  • We accept Purchase Orders. For a quote or to pay via P.O., contact us
  • For multiple school/district discounts, contact us
  • Contact us for demonstrations or presentations.
  • Please download the Cyber Civics™ Year 3 FAQ's.

Contact us at support@cybercivics.com or call (949) 481-4319

Plus!

About the Founder

Diana Graber, M.A., created and teaches Cyber Civics™ at Journey School, a public charter Waldorf school in Southern California. She has an extensive background as a media producer and also co-founded CyberWise, a digital literacy resource for parents; and CyberWise Certified, a self-paced, online certification program to help educators prepare to teach these lessons. As an Adjunct Professor of Media Psychology at the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology she taught "Media Psychology for the 21st Century." Her published paper: New Media Literacy Education: A Developmental Approach (JMLE, 2012) provides the foundational research for the Cyber Civics™ program. She is also a regular contributor to the Huffington Post

Testimonials

“Since the Cyber Civics™ classes started at our school, there have been only three reported incidences of poor digital behavior; none in the last two years. This is unheard of in this day and age. What has been a small investment has paid off tenfold. Plus it allows us to put our energy on what matters most, learning and teaching in a happy, safe, and healthy community.”

-Shaheer Faltas, Journey School Administrator

 

  “Over the course of three years working with Diana Graber and watching her develop the curriculum, I recognize that it is based on the the same cognitive developmental skills that are foundational to Waldorf teaching in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades. While this curriculum has found a rich home in Waldorf schools that foster ethical development, it is a curriculum that can fit in all educational settings.

- Bonnie River, Chair of Hybrid Program, Rudolf Steiner College

 

 "Cyber Civics is the best digital media literacy curriculum I've seen yet as it is developmentally based and creative."

-Sheila Reilly, Administrator, Woodland Star Charter School

 

 "Since cyber-life is imperative to a child's future, isn't it about time to demand that schools implement Cyber Civics classes?"

-Online Expert Sue Scheff, in "Digital Citizenship Is as Important as Potty Training: Let's Start Cyber Civics In All Schools

 

 "We know that digital-citizenship education works. The Journey School in Aliso Viejo, a small Southern California city, is an example of a digital-citizenship success story. Since instituting a three-year middle school series on digital citizenship, information literacy, and media-literacy courses to teach critical-thinking skills around media texts of all kinds—music videos, film, and print advertising—the school has nearly eliminated bullying and behavioral issues ans significanly boosted standardized-test scores."

                                                                  -Erin McNeill, "Even 'Digital Natives' Need Digital Training" in Education Week                                                                                       

"Journey School in Aliso Viejo implemented a weekly course to help kids navigate the online world...a lot of young kids don't appreciate that what they post online is permanent, and need to be taught that their digital footprint will live forever. To get this message through to kids, nothing beats peer-to-peer interactions."

-Al Jazeera's "America Tonight"  

"We are not only citizens of the town, state and country we live in, but also digital citizens of the online world.  As such, how we interact with the community at large is an increasingly-important part of our lives.  And just like a Civics class you may have taken in high school, every student in the near future will be taking a Cyber Civics class."

-David Ryan Polgar, WWLP-22 News

Curriculum

  • Media Literacy For Positive Participation
  • Preview
    What IS Media Literacy?
  • Welcome to Year 3
  • Syllabus
  • Preparing To Teach Year 3
  • NAMLE: Core Principles of Media Literacy Education
  • Media Literacy Education Legislation
  • Unit 1: Living in a Participatory Culture
  • Lesson 1: Are You a Consumer or a Producer?
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Paying Attention to Your Attention
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Let's Get Blogging (2 Parts)
  • Lesson 3: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Video 2
  • Unit 2: Calling On Critical Thinking
  • Lesson 1: C.R.A.P. Detection, Part 1
  • Lesson 2: C.R.A.P. Detection, Part 2
  • Unit 3: Fake News
  • Lesson 1: What's "News"?
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Urban Legend or Not?
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Is It Fake or Not?
  • Unit 4: Seeing Stereotypes
  • Lesson 1: Stereotypes in Media, Part 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 2
  • Lesson 2: Stereotypes in Media, Part 2
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Video 2
  • Lesson 3: Selling to the Stereotypes (2 Parts)
  • Unit 5: Visual Literacy
  • Lesson 1: Every Picture Tells a Story
  • Lesson 2: Before There Was Photoshop
  • Lesson 3: Spot That Photoshop
  • Lesson 3: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Video 2
  • Lesson 3: Video 3
  • Lesson 4: Food Takes Center Stage
  • Lesson 4: Video 1
  • Lesson 4: Video 2
  • Lesson 4: Video 3
  • Unit 6: Sexting
  • Lesson 1: Can We Talk About Sexting? Part 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Can We Talk About Sexting? Part 2
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Video 2
  • Unit 7: Final Project Prep
  • Lesson 1: Constructing an Effective Search Query
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 2: Using Filters & Operators (2 parts)
  • Lesson 3: Search Like a Pro
  • Lesson 3: Video 1
  • Lesson 4: Avoiding Plagiarism
  • Lesson 4: Video 1
  • Lesson 4: Video 2
  • Lesson 4: Video 3
  • Lesson 4: Video 4
  • Lesson 5: How To Cite Right
  • Lesson 5: Video 1
  • Lesson 6: Let's Review! Copyright, Fair Use, Public Domain
  • Lesson 6: Video 1
  • Lesson 7: Present Like a Pro!
  • Lesson 7: Video 1
  • Lesson 7: Video 2
  • Lesson 7: Video 3
  • Lesson 7: Video 4
  • Lesson 7: Video 5
  • Unit 8: Positive Participation
  • Lesson 1: The Power of Social Media
  • Lesson 1: Video 1
  • Lesson 1: Video 2
  • Lesson 2: GoEnnounce Yourself
  • Lesson 2: Video 1
  • Lesson 3: Trolls, Lurkers, and Upstanders
  • Final Project
  • Are You a Consumer or a Producer Now?